KILLER ORTHODOX PRIESTS.

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Famous Killer Orthodox Priests & Bishops.

(notes - under construction)

The orthodox bless arms and soldiers, then pretend to be pacifist. It is yet another example of a long list of oxymoronic teachings of Orthodoxy, requiring those indoctrinated into it to use "doublethink" all their lives.

Eastern Orthodoxy:

Archbishop Valerian D. Trifa: former ruling bishop of the Romanian Orthodox Episcopate of America from 1957 until 1984. He was discovered to have a secret past after becoming a priest and rising through the Orthodox ranks to Archbishop of Detroit, , he was accused of being a member of the Iron Guard in Romania, a Nazi style organization, sympathetic to Adolf Hitler and a group who encouraged violence against Jews, making him a war criminal if found to be true.

On Jan 20th 1941 he was accused of making a hate filled radio broadcast from the Romanian capital city of Bucharest, and that broadcast culminated in the rounding up of thousands of Jews in Bucharest the next day known as The Pogrom , He was the editor of the Romanian Iron Guard newspaper Libertatea, which also called for violence against Jews.

One New York dentist, a Romanian called Charles Kramer, refused to let the case die, as some of his relatives were killed by the Iron Guard, and for 20 years he petitioned the US Government to examine the case,  In 1973 the Department of Justice officially opened an investigation into whether Trifa had played a role in murdering Jews in World War 2. They approached the West German Government to access evidence from the meticulous records kept in the war, and in their archives they found 22 postcards written by a man named Viorel Trifa who had been a member of the Iron Guard. The writer was a guest of the Nazi Government, and spent the war in relative comfort. Gideon Epstein was asked to conduct a handwriting analysis, who concluded there was no doubt the postcards were written by Valerian Trifa. This meant Trifa had lied when entering the USA, but he vowed to fight any deportation. 

A few more years passed by until a new laser technique was invented capable of lifting fingerprints from the postcards without damaging them. A clear left thumbprint was obtained from a single card, which was compared to a thumbprint preserved on the document Trifa entered the USA with in 1950, and it was a perfect match.   

When informed of the thumbprint match Archbishop Valerian Trifa surrendered his US citizenship. For two years no other country was willing to accept Trifa, In 1984 Portugal  agreed to take him, where Trifa died in exile in 1987. 

the allegations of war crimes against Trifa are examined in an episode of Forensic Files - Season 5, Ep 13: called Unholy Vows. see link to  youtube 

https://youtu.be/2tzb2OsQxGg

Cyril of Alexandria -  He is also known for his expulsion of Novatians and Jews from Alexandria and for inflaming tensions that led to the murder of the Hellenistic philosopher Hypatia by a Christian mob. Historians disagree over the extent of his responsibility in this.

1)  Luka Lazarević (1774–1852), Serbian Orthodox priest, vojvoda (general) of the Serbian Revolution.[11]

 

2)  Matija Nenadović  (1777–1854), Serbian Orthodox archpriest, commander in the Serbian Revolution.[12]

 

3)  Athanasios Diakos (1788–1821), Greek Orthodox priest, commander in the Greek War of Independence.

 

4)  Mićo Ljubibratić (1839–1889), Serbian Orthodox priest, fought in the Herzegovina Uprising.[13]

 

5)  Bogdan Zimonjić (1813–1909), Serbian Orthodox priest, active during the 1852–62 and 1875–78 uprisings in Herzegovina

 

6)  Vukajlo Božović, Serbian Orthodox archpriest, fought in the Balkan Wars.[14]

 

7)  Jovan Grković-Gapon (1879–1912), Serbian Orthodox priest, guerrilla in Macedonia.

 

8)  Tasa Konević, Serbian Orthodox priest, guerrilla in Macedonia.

 

9)  Mihailo Dožić (1848–1914), Serbian Orthodox priest, guerrilla in Potarje (1875–78).

 

10)  Stevan Dimitrijević (1866–1953), Serbian Orthodox priest, guerrilla in Macedonia (fl. 1904).

 

11)  Momčilo Đujić (1907–1999), Serbian Orthodox priest, World War II Chetnik.

 

12)  Vlada Zečević (1903–1970), Serbian Orthodox priest, Yugoslav Partisan.

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1)  Luka Lazarević (1774–1852), Serbian Orthodox priest, vojvoda (general) of the Serbian Revolution.[11]

 

2)  Nikola Smiljanić (1760–1815), Serbian Orthodox archpriest, commander in the Serbian Revolution.[12]

 

3)  Milutin Ilić, Serbian Orthodox priest, commander in the Serbian Revolution.[12]

 

4)  Matija Nenadović (1777–1854), Serbian Orthodox archpriest, commander in the Serbian Revolution.[12]

 

5)  Neofit Marković (fl. 1815–27), Serbian Orthodox priestmonk, fought in the First Serbian Uprising.[12]

 

6)  Atanasije Antonijević (1734–1804), Serbian Orthodox priest, blessed the Orašac Assembly and fought in the First Serbian Uprising.

 

7)  Melentije Nikšić (d. 1816), Serbian Orthodox priest, fought in the First and Second Serbian Uprising.

 

8)  Samuilo Jakovljević (d. 1824), Serbian Orthodox abbot, fought in the First Serbian Uprising.

 

9)  Melentije Stevanović (1766–1824), Serbian Orthodox abbot, fought in the First Serbian Uprising.

 

10)  Melentije Pavlović (1776–1833), Serbian Orthodox abbot, fought in the First Serbian Uprising.

 

11)  Milutin Ilić Gučanin (d. 1814), Serbian Orthodox priest, fought in the First Serbian Uprising.

 

12) Nikola Smiljanić (1777–1815), Serbian Orthodox priest, fought in the First Serbian Uprising.

 

13)  Filip Petrović (1775–1820), Serbian Orthodox priest, fought in the First Serbian Uprising.

 

14)  Athanasios Diakos (1788–1821), Greek Orthodox priest, commander in the Greek War of Independence.

 

15)  Petar Radović (1832–1907), Serbian Orthodox priest, fought in the Herzegovina Uprising.[13]

 

16)  Mićo Ljubibratić (1839–1889), Serbian Orthodox priest, fought in the Herzegovina Uprising.[14]

 17)  Bogdan Zimonjić (1813–1909), Serbian Orthodox priest, active during the 1852–62 and 1875–78 uprisings in Herzegovina

 

18)  Vukajlo Božović, Serbian Orthodox archpriest, fought in the Balkan Wars.[15]

 

19)  Rista K. Popović (1870–1917), Serbian Orthodox priest.

 

20)  Papadrakos (1872–19XX), Greek Orthodox priest, active in the Macedonian Struggle.[16]

 

21)  Jevto Popović, Serbian Orthodox priest.

 

22)  Prokopije Vujišić, Serbian Orthodox priest.

 

23)  Jovan Grković-Gapon (1879–1912), Serbian Orthodox priest, guerrilla in Macedonia.

 

24)  Tasa Konević, Serbian Orthodox priest, guerrilla in Macedonia.

 

25)  Mihailo Dožić (1848–1914), Serbian Orthodox priest, guerrilla in Potarje (1875–78).

 

26)  Stevan Dimitrijević (1866–1953), Serbian Orthodox priest, guerrilla in Macedonia (fl. 1904).

 

27)  Momčilo Đujić (1907–1999), Serbian Orthodox priest, World War II Chetnik.

 

28)  Vlada Zečević (1903–1970), Serbian Orthodox priest, Yugoslav Partisan.

 

29)  Georgije Bojić (1908–1946), Serbian Orthodox priestmonk, Yugoslav Partisan.







Acaciusc. 303 Byzantium
Andrew the Generalc. 300 Cilicia
Demetrius of Thessaloniki 304 Sirmium
Emeterius and Chelidoniusc. 300 Calagurris in Hispania Tarraconensis
Eustace
Florianc. 303 Lauriacum in Noricum
Georgec. 303 Nicomedia in Bithynia
Gereon Catholic Church
Joan of Arc Catholic Church
Maurice and
the Theban Legion 287 Agaunum in Alpes Poeninae et Graiae Catholic Church
Martin of Tours Catholic Church
Maximilian 295 Tebessa in Africa Pronsularis
Marcellus of Tangier 298 Tingis in Mauretania Tingitana
Menasc. 309 Cotyaeum in Phrygia
Mercurius 250 Caesarea in Cappadocia
Sergius and Bacchusc. 305 Resafa and Barbalissus in Syria Euphratensis
Theodore of Amasea 306 Amasea in Helenopontus
Typasius the Veteran 304 Tigava in Mauretania Caesariensis
Varusc. 307 Egypt
Victor the Moorc. 303 Milan in Italy
Nicetas the Goth 372 Dacia
Forty Martyrs of Sebaste 320 Sebaste