List of Byzantine Emperors.

List of Byzantine Emperors.

These pages are being printed to help prove the people in the religion of Orthodoxy are mass murderers just like the Roman Catholics are, but on a lesser scale (as Catholicism has been particularly murderous). 

To complicate things there is another female figure representing murder and war, in Galatians 4, that is Hagar - those who choose to abide under the old now dead anachronistic and violent Law of Moses, beside the Whore of Babylon and her daughters. The Hagar spirit will justify the defence of Earthly boundaries with war, such as Earthly Jerusalem, not seeing the in the Spirit directive to concentrate on the Jerusalem above, which is now Sarah, or the Peace and Love church of Jesus. It can be argued there is the Jezebel spirit also as in Revelation, perhaps churches prone to doctrine modified by susceptibility to hedonism.

List of Byzantine Emperors,

Constantinian Dynasty  (306–363) .

 

324 –337 ,   Constantine I "the Great".  .

the Battle of the Milvian Bridge in 312..

tradition is deathbed baptism (as "man of blood" ?)

337 - 361 ,    Constantius II .

sole Roman Emperor from 353, after the overthrow of the western usurper Magnentius

Constantius' reign saw military activity on all frontiers, and dissension between Arianism,

337 – 350  .   Constans I  .
the third surviving son of Constantine I. 

Caesar since 333, he inherited the central third of Roman Empire upon his father's death, and became sole emperor in the west following the death of Constantine II in 348.

An ardent supporter of Athanasius of Alexandria, he opposed Arianism.

Constans was assassinated during the coup of Magnentius.[6]

361 – 363  .  Julian "the Apostate"   (Flavius Claudius Iulianus)

grandson of Constantius Chlorus and cousin of Constantius II. Proclaimed by his army in Gaul, became legitimate Emperor upon the death of Constantius. His bloody history is of no account to my research except his persecution of Christians, as he was an complete unbeliever and is not an example of an "Orthodox style" killer ruler.

Non-dynastic   (363–364) .

363 – 364   Jovian  (Flavius Iovianus)  Captain of the guards under Julian, elected by the army upon Julian's death. Died on journey back to Constantinople,

Valentinian Dynasty  (364–379)

364 – 375.  Valentinian I (Flavius Valentinianus)  .

An officer under Julian and Jovian, he was elected by the army upon Jovian's death. He soon appointed his younger brother Valens as Emperor of the East. Died of cerebral haemorrhage .

 

364 – 378   Valens (Flavius Iulius Valens) .

A soldier of the Roman army, he was appointed Emperor of the East by his elder brother Valentinian I. Killed at the Battle of Adrianople  .

 

378 – 379  Gratian   (Flavius Gratianus) ,

the son of Valentinian I. Emperor of the West, he inherited rule of the East upon the death of Valens and appointed Theodosius I as Emperor of the East. Assassinated on 25 August 383 during the rebellion of Magnus Maximus  .

Theodosian Dynasty. (379–457) .

379 - 395 :    Theodosius I  ("the Great")  ,
Aristocrat and military leader, brother-in-law of Gratian, who appointed him as emperor of the East. From 392 until his death sole Roman Emperor.

 

395 - 408 :   Flavius Arcadius  .
he eldest son of Theodosius I. On the death of Theodosius I in 395, the Roman Empire was permanently divided between the East Roman Empire, later known as the Byzantine Empire, and the West Roman Empire. Theodosius' eldest son Arcadius became emperor in the East while his younger son Honorius became emperor in the West.

408 - 450 :    Flavius  Theodosius II  .
the only son of Arcadius. Succeeded upon the death of his father. As a minor, the praetorian prefect Anthemius was regent in 408–414. He died in a riding accident.

450 - 457 :  Marcian   ( and his notorious wife Saint Aelia Pulcheria ) seen as co-rukers.
Marcian was a soldier and politician, he became emperor after being wed by the Augusta Pulcheria, sister of Theodosius II, following the latter's death. Died of gangrene. .

Leonid dynasty .  (457–518) .

457 - 474 : Leo I (the Great)

 

474           : Leo II .

 

474 - 475, 476 - 491 : Zeno .

Deposed in 475 and restored the following year.

 

475 - 476 : Basiliscus .

Rival to Zeno

 

491- 518 : Anastasius I .

 

Leonid dynasty .  (457–518)

457 - 474 : Flavius Valerius  Leo I  (The Great) (the Thracian)  . 
Leo became a low-ranking officer and served as an attendant of the Gothic commander-in-chief of the army, Aspar, who chose him as Emperor on Marcian's death. He was the first emperor to be crowned by the Patriarch of Constantinople. His reign was marked by the pacification of the Danube frontier and peace with Persia, which allowed him to intervene in the affairs of the western empire, supporting candidates for the throne and dispatching an expedition to recover Carthage from the Vandals in 468. Initially a puppet of Aspar, Leo began promoting the Isaurians as a counterweight to Aspar's Goths, marrying his daughter Ariadne to the Isaurian leader Tarasicodissa (Zeno). With their support, in 471 Aspar was murdered and Gothic power over the army was broken.[7]

 

 

474                 Flavius  Leo II .
he was the grandson of Leo I by Leo's daughter Ariadne and her Isaurian husband, Zeno. He was raised to Caesar on 18 November 473. Leo ascended the throne after the death of his Grandfather, on 19 January 474. He crowned his father Zeno as co-emperor and effective regent on 10 November 474. He died shortly after, on 10 November 474. [8] [9]

  

 

474 - 475,   Flavius  Zeno  .

476 - 491     Flavius  Zeno   .

Deposed in 475 and restored the following year.

As the leader of Leo I's Isaurian soldiers, he rose to comes domesticorum, married the emperor's daughter Ariadne and took the name Zeno, and played a crucial role in the elimination of Aspar and his Goths.

He was named co-emperor by his son on 9 February 474, and became sole ruler upon the latter's death, but had to flee to his native country before Basiliscus in 475, regaining control of the capital in 476. Zeno concluded peace with the Vandals, saw off challenges against him by Illus and Verina, and secured peace in the Balkans by enticing the Ostrogoths under Theodoric the Great to migrate to Italy.  Zeno's reign also saw the end of the western line of emperors. His pro-Monophysite stance made him unpopular and his promulgation of the Henotikon resulted in the Acacian Schism with the papacy. [10]

 

 

475 - 476 :   Basiliscus  .
(Βασιλίσκος, Flavius Basiliscus)9 January 475 –
August 476General and brother-in-law of Leo I, he seized power from Zeno but was again deposed by him. Died in 476/477

 

 

491- 518 :    Anastasius I Dicorus  .
(Ἀναστάσιος Αʹ ὁ Δίκορος, Flavius Anastasius)11 April 491 –
9 July 518Born ca. 430 at Dyrrhachium, he was a palace official (silentiarius) when he was chosen as her husband and Emperor by Empress-dowager Ariadne. He was nicknamed "Dikoros" (Latin: Dicorus), because of his heterochromia. Anastasius reformed the tax system and the Byzantine coinage and proved a frugal ruler, so that by the end of his reign he left a substantial surplus. His Monophysite sympathies led to widespread opposition, most notably the Revolt of Vitalian and the Acacian Schism. His reign was also marked by the first Bulgar raids into the Balkans and by a war with Persia over the foundation of Dara. He died childless.[11]

 

 

 

 

Justinian dynasty  . (518–602) .

518 - 527  :  Justin I  .

527 - 565  : Justinian I (the Great) .

565 - 578 :  Justin II Flavius Justinus .

578 - 582  :  Tiberius Constantinus  .

582 - 602   :  Maurice (Mauritius)  .

590 - 602   :  Theodosius .

Son of Maurice, co-emperor 590 - 602

 

Non-dynastic  . (602–610)

 

602 - 610  :  Phocas

Heraclian dynasty . (610–695) .

 

610 - 641  Heraclius I

641             Constantine III Heraclius

641             Heracleonas (Heraclius II)

641- 668   Constans II Pogonatus (bearded)

668 - 685  Constantine IV

685 - 695, Justinian II Rhinotmetus (slit nosed)

 

Twenty Years' Anarchy . (695–717) .

695 - 698  :   Leontius .

698 - 705   :  Tiberius III Apsimar .

705 - 711     :  Justinian II Rhinotmetus (slit nosed)  .

711 - 713   :     Philippicus Bardanes  .

 

713 - 715   :     Anastasius II  .

715 - 717    :    Theodosius III  .

Isaurian dynasty :  (717–802) .

717 - 741  :   Leo III (the Isaurian) .

741 - 775   :  Constantine V Copronymus (dung-named)

741 - 743    :  Artabasdus  .

775 - 780    :  Leo IV (the Khazar)  .

780 - 797    :  Constantine VI (the blinded)

797 - 802    :  Irene  (first ever Empress)

Nikephorian dynasty  (Phocid Dynasty?)  (802–813)  .

802 - 811    :  Nicephorus I .

811             :  Stauracius .

811 - 813     :  Michael I Rhangabé .

Non-dynastic (813–820)  .

813 - 820    :  Leo V (the Armenian)

Amorian dynasty (Phrygian Dynasty?)  (820–867) .

 

820 - 829     :   Michael II the Amorian  .

829 - 842      :  Theophilus I .

842 - 855      : Theodora  .

(regent for Michael III)

842 - 867      :   Michael III (the drunkard) .

Macedonian dynasty .  (867–1056) .

867 - 886     :   Basil I (the Macedonian)  .

886 - 912     :   Leo VI (the Wise)  .

912 - 913     :   Alexander III  .

913 - 959     :   Constantine VII Porphyrogenetus (purple-born)  .

920 - 944     :   Romanus I Lecapenus  .

959 - 963     :   Romanus II  .

963 - 969     :   Nicephorus II Phocas  .

969 - 976     :   John I Tzimisces  .

976 - 1025   :  Basil II Bulgaroctonus (Bulgar-Slayer)  ,

(actually named co-emperor in 960 but empire was ruled by regent until 976)  .

1025 - 1028  :  Constantine VIII  .

1028 - 1034  :  Romanus III Argyropolus  .

1028 - 1050  :  Zoe I  .

1034 - 1041  :  Michael IV (the Paphlagonian)  .

1041 - 1042  :  Michael V Calaphates  .

1042             :  Theodora  .

1042 - 1055  :   Constantine IX Monomachus  .

SCHISM OF 1054.

1055 - 1056 :   Theodora  .

Non-dynastic .  (1056–1057)  .

1056 - 1057  :   Michael VI Stratioticus (the bellicose)  .

Komnenid (Comnenid) dynasty .  (1057–1059)  .

1057 - 1059   :  Isaac I Comnenus  .

Doukid (Ducas) dynasty   .  (1059–1081)  .

 

1059 - 1067   :  Constantine X Ducas   .

1067 - 1078   :  Michael VII Parapinakes  .

1068 - 1071   :  Romanus IV Diogenes  .

1078 - 1081    :  Nicephorus III Botaniates  .

Nicephorus Bryennius

Nicephorus Basilacius

Nicephorus Melissenus

 

Komnenid (Comnenid)  dynasty .  (1081–1185)  .

1081 - 1118     :  Alexius I Comnenus

1118 - 1143     :  John II Comnenus (the beautiful)

1143 - 1180     :  Manuel I Comnenus (the Great)

1180 - 1183     :  Alexius II Comnenus

1183 - 1185     :  Andronicus I Comnenus

 

Komnenid (Comnenid) Angelid dynasties . (1185–1204)

1184 - 1195  :  Isaac Comnenus  (Emperor of Cyprus)  ,

1185 - 1195 &  Isaac II Angelus  .

1203 - 1204  :  Isaac II Angelus  .

 

1195 - 1204   :  Alexius III Angelus  .

(Deposed in the 4th Crusade in 1203 and replaced by Isaac II and Alexius IV but maintained limited 'provincial' control outside of Constantinople.)

1203 - 1204    :  Alexius IV Angelus  .

Angelid Dynasty (1204) .

1204                :  Alexius V Ducas Murtzuphlus (bushy-eyebrowed)

Laskarid dynasty (Empire of Nicaea, .  (1204–1261)  .

1205 - 1222     :   Theodore I Lascaris  .

(exiled in Nicaea after the 4th Crusade)  .

 

1222 - 1254     :  John III Ducas Vatatzes  .

1254 - 1258     :  Theodore II Lascaris  .

1258 - 1261     :   John IV Lascaris  .

Palaiologan dynasty (restored to Constantinople, 1261–1453)  .

1259 - 1282   :   Michael VIII Palaeologus  .

(restored to Constantinople)

 

1282 - 1328    :  Andronicus II Palaeologus  .

1328 - 1341    :  Andronicus III Palaeologus  .

1341 - 1376,   :  John V Palaeologus  .

1379 - 1390,   :  John V Palaeologus  .

1391               :  John V Palaeologus  .

1347 - 1354    :  John VI Cantacuzenus  .

1376 - 1379    :  Andronicus IV Palaeologus

1390,

1399 - 1402    :  John VII Palaeologus

1391 - 1425    :  Manuel II Palaeologus

1425 - 1448    :  John VIII Palaeologus

1448 - 1453    :  Constantine XI Palaeologus Dragatses

Claimants in exile  .

link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Byzantine_emperors