List of (Orthodox) Patriarchs of Alexandria.

discussing the use of the word "Orthodox" as an anachronism before the 1054 split is pedantic as this is how they perceive it today, and hold the early characters were in agreement with them (if they even existed).

contrast this list with List of the Popes of the Coptic See of Alexandria: and we must ask the question "Is the Coptic line yet another line of Apostolic Bishops denied as valid by Eastern Orthodoxy?".

This is a very difficult and convoluted issue to explore when one "person" (ie may not have existed) is given many names. I have yet to isolate just how different the proposed Coptic Popes of Alexandria are from the Apostolic Bishops of Alexandria of Orthodoxy really are.

1st Century.

1)  Saint Mark the Evangelist (43–68).

2)  Anianus (68–85).

3)  Avilius (85–98).

4)  Kedron (98–109).

2nd Century.

4)  Kedron (98–109).

5)  Primus (109–121).

6)  Justus (121–131).

7)  Eumenes (131–141).

8)  Markianos (142–152).

9)  Celadion (152–166).

10)  Agrippinus (167–178).

11)  Julian (178–189).

12)  Demetrius I (189–232).

3rd Century.

12)  Demetrius I (189–232).

13)  Heraclas (232–248).

14)  Dionysius (248–264),

15)  Maximus (265–282),

16)  Theonas (282–300).

4th Century.

16)  Theonas (282–300).

17)  Peter I (300–311).

18)  Achillas (312–313).

19)  Alexander I (313–326), First Ecumenical Council occurred.

20)  Athanasius I (328–339) Served as a Deacon for the First Council; later became Pope of Alexandria.

21)  Gregory of Cappadocia (339–346), an Arian installed by the Emperor.

22) Athanasius I (restored) (346–373)..

23)  Peter II (373–380).

24)  Timothy I (380–385), Second Ecumenical Council occurred.

25)  Theophilus I (385–412).

5th Century.

25)  Theophilus I (385–412).

26)  Cyril I (412–444), Third Ecumenical Council occurred.

27)  Dioscorus I (444–451), Second Council of Ephesus occurred. Pope Dioscorus was later deposed by the Council of Chalcedon but still recognized by Miaphysites until his death in 454.

Orthodox/Oriental Schism of 451: mentioned as I presume the Oriental Orthodox church deny the apostolic line of Bishops that proceeded from the date 451 AD? And have their own lines of "true apostolic bishops" (?).The break in communion between the various Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox churches did not occur suddenly, but rather gradually over 2-3 centuries following the Council of Chalcedon

28)  Proterius (451–457) Deposed by Coptic (Alexandrian) Synod under Timothy II Aelurus, Chalcedonian.

29)  Timothy II Aelurus (457–460), Miaphysite.

30)  Timothy III Salophakiolos (460–475), Chalcedonian but not recognized by Miaphysites who continued to recognise Timothy II Aelurus

Timothy II Aelurus (restored) (475–477), Miaphysite.

31)  Peter III Mongus (477), Miaphysite.

32)  Timothy III Salophakiolos (restored) (477–481), Chalcedonian.

33)  John I Talaia, (481–482), Chalcedonian but not recognized by Miaphysites who continued to recognise Peter III Mongus

Peter III Mongus (restored) (482–490), Miaphysite.

34)  Athanasius II (490–496), Miaphysite.

35)  John I (496–505), Miaphysite.

6th Century.

35)  John I (496–505), Miaphysite.

36)  John II (505–516), Miaphysite.

37)  Dioscorus II (516–517), Miaphysite.

38)  Timothy III (517–535), Miaphysite.

39)  Theodosius I (535–536), Miaphysite X

Gainas (536), in opposition to Theodosius.

In 536 the Greek Orthodox Church of Alexandria withdrew their recognition of Theodosius I and elected Paul as Patriarch, while the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria continued to recognize Theodosius.

See also:

 

Patriarch of Alexandria

 

External links:

Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Alexandria.

 

 

The Patriarch of Alexandria.

The Patriarch of Alexandria (also known as the Bishop of Alexandria or Pope of Alexandria) is the highest-ranking bishop of Egypt. The Patriarchs trace back their lineage to Mark the Evangelist.

Following the Council of Chalcedon in 451, a schism occurred in Egypt, between those who accepted and those who rejected the decisions of the Council. The former are known as Chalcedonians and the latter are known as Miaphysites. Over the next several decades, these two parties competed on the See of Alexandria and frequently still recognized the same Patriarch. But after 536, they permanently established separate patriarchates, and have maintained separate lineages of Patriarchs. The Miaphysites became the Coptic Orthodox Church (part of Oriental Orthodoxy) and the Chalcedonians became the Greek Orthodox Church of Alexandria (part of the wider Eastern Orthodox Church).

Therefore, this list only contains those Patriarchs who served before 536. For later Popes and Patriarchs, follow the links at the bottom of this page.

For later succession of (Coptic) Popes and (Greek) Patriarchs, see:

original article: link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Patriarchs_of_Alexandria

    List of Patriarchs of Alexandria.

(as perceived by Eastern Orthodoxy.)

Patriarchs of Alexandria before the Council of Chalcedon:

  1. Mark the Evangelist (43–68)

  2. Anianus (68–82)

  3. Avilius (83–95)

  4. Kedronus (96–106)

  5. Primus (106–118)

  6. Justus (118–129)

  7. Eumenes (131–141)

  8. Markianos (142–152)

  9. Celadion (152–166)

  10. Agrippinus (167–178)

  11. Julian (178–189)

  12. Demetrius I (189–232)

  13. Heraclas (232–248)

  14. Dionysius (248–264)

  15. Maximus (265–282)

  16. Theonas (282–300)

  17. Peter I (300–311)

  18. Achillas (312–313)

  19. Alexander I (313–326) First ecumenical Council occurred

    vacant (326–328)

  20. Athanasius I (328–339) Served as a Deacon for the First Council; became Pope of AlexandriaGregory of Cappadocia (339–346), Arian Patriarch; not accepted by the adherents of the Nicene creed (and thus not counted by Coptic OrthodoxByzantine Orthodox or Catholic lineages).

    Athanasius I (346–373) (restored)

  21. Peter II (373–380)

    Lucius of Alexandria (373–377), an Arian installed by the Emperor and not recognized by the adherents of the Nicene Creed

  22. Timothy I (380–385) Second Ecumenical Council occurred

  23. Theophilus I (385–412)

  24. Cyril I (412–444) Third Ecumenical Council occurred

  25. Dioscorus I (444–451) Fourth Ecumenical Council occurred - Schism between Eastern Orthodoxy and Oriental Orthodoxy - Dioscorus was deposed by the Council of Chalcedon

 

Greek Orthodox Patriarchs of Alexandria after Chalcedon:

vacant (457–460)

  1. Proterius (451–457)

  2. Timothy III Salophakiolos (460–475)vacant (475–477)

    Timothy III Salophakiolos (477–482) (restored)

  3. John I Talaias (482)

    vacant (482–536)

  4. Gainas (536–537)

  5. Paul (537–542)

  6. Zoilus (542–551)

  7. Apollinarius (551–569)

  8. John IV (569–579)

    vacant (579–581)

  9. Eulogius I (581–608)

  10. Theodore I (608–610)

  11. John V the Merciful (610–621)

  12. George I (621–630)

  13. Cyrus (631–641) Islam entered Egypt

    vacant (641–642)

  14. Peter IV (642–651)

    Theodore II

  15. Peter V

  16. Peter VITheophylactus

    Onopsus

  17. Cosmas I (727–768)

  18. Politianus (768–813)

  19. Eustatius (813–817)

  20. Christopher I (817–841)

  21. Sophronius I (841–860)

  22. Michael I (860–870)

  23. Michael II (870–903)

    vacant (903–907)

  24. Christodoulos (907–932)

  25. Eutychius (932–940)

  26. Sophronius II (941)

  27. Isaac (941–954)

  28. Job (954–960)

    vacant (960–963)

  29. Elias I (963–1000)

  30. Arsenius (1000–1010)

  31. Theophilus (1010–1020)

  32. George II (1021–1051)

  33. Leontius (1052–1059)

  34. Alexander II (1059–1062)

  35. John VI Kodonatos (1062–1100)

    Eulogius (1100–1117) Coadjutor?

  36. Cyril II (1100– )

  37. Sabbas (1117– )

    Theodosius II ( –1137) Coadjutor?

  38. Sophronius III (1137–1171)

  39. Elias II (1171–1175)

  40. Eleutherius (1175–1180)

  41. Mark III (1180–1209)

  42. Nicholas I (1210–1243)

  43. Gregory I (1243–1263)

  44. Nicholas II (1263–1276)

  45. Athanasius III (1276–1316)

  46. Gregory II (1316–1354)

  47. Gregory III (1354–1366)

  48. Niphon (1366–1385)

  49. Mark IV (1385–1389)

  50. Nicholas III (1389–1398)

  51. Gregory IV (1398–1412)

  52. Nicholas IV (1412–1417)

  53. Athanasius IV (1417–1425)

  54. Mark V (1425–1435)

  55. Philotheus (1435–1459)

  56. Mark VI (1459–1484)

  57. Gregory V (1484–1486)

  58. Joachim Pany (1486–1567)

    vacant (1567–1569)

  59. Silvester (1569–1590)

  60. Meletius I (1590–1601)

  61. Cyril III Loucaris (1601–1620)

  62. Gerasimus I Spartaliotes (1620–1636)

  63. Metrophanes Kritikopoulos (1636–1639)

  64. Nicephorus (1639–1645)

  65. Joannicius (1645–1657)

  66. Paisius (1657–1678)

  67. Parthenius I (1678–1688)

  68. Gerasimus II Paladas (1688–1710)

  69. Samuel Kapasoulis (1710–1712)

  70. Cosmas II (1712–1714)

    Samuel (restored) (1714–1723)

    Cosmas II (restored) (1723–1736)

  71. Cosmas III (1737–1746)

  72. Matthew Psaltis (1746–1766)

  73. Cyprian (1766–1783)

  74. Gerasimus III Gimaris (1783–1788)

  75. Parthenius II Pankostas (1788–1805)

  76. Theophilus III Pankostas (1805–1825)

  77. Hierotheus I (1825–1845)

  78. Artemius (1845–1847)

  79. Hierotheus II (1847–1858)

  80. Callinicus (1858–1861)

  81. Jacob (1861–1865)

  82. Nicanor (1866–1869)

  83. Sophronius IV (1870–1899)

  84. Photius (1900–1925)

  85. Meletius II Metaxakis (1926–1935)

  86. Nicholas V (1936–1939)

  87. Christopher II (1939–1966)

    vacant (1966–1968)

  88. Nicholas VI (1968–1986)

  89. Parthenius III (1986–1996)

  90. Peter VII (1997–2004)

  91. Theodore II (2004–present)