Titular Heads of Orthodoxy.

        First - Fifteenth Centuries

    (as perceived by the Orthodox)

note: linked forever to Constantine.

                                                                                                                Part 2 here>

Bishops of Byzantium (until 330). (wiki)

First Century.

1. Saint. Andrew the Apostle (38), founder (St. Andrew as founder is disputed by many Catholics.) Funny how they cannot even remember who the first bishop was, as the Catholics firmly disagree, so called Apostolic authority of hand-me-down power being so important and all. 

Apparently the Orthodox insist Andrew was dead, crucified on an X shaped cross (more groundless tradition) by 38AD, but other historians say he lived until the late first century, making the claims St. Stachys the Apostle (38–54) and St. Onesimus (54–68) were the bishop in Byzantium after him two religious wives tales. 

Laughably they call that history, so certain we should put their tradition above the bible.

The tradition...

1) In Georgia is St Andrew preached there.

2) The people of Cyprus say he did a miracle there after he was shipwrecked.

3) The official stance of the Romanian Orthodox Church is that Andrew preached the Gospel in the province of Dobruja (Scythia Minor) to the Daco-Romans, whom he is said to have converted to Christianity.

4) East Slavs: Tradition regarding the early Christian history of Ukraine holds that the apostle Andrew preached on the southern borders of modern-day Ukraine,

5) In Scotland - one story is the Emperor Constantine transferred the remaining parts of Andrew's body to Constantinople.. several legends state that the relics of Andrew were brought by divine guidance by one Regulus to the Pictish king Óengus mac Fergusa (729–761).from Constantinople to the place where the modern Scottish town of St Andrews stands today. I need to check this, but, apparently they think among his relics they have St Andrew's right foot, and bits of his X shaped cross. if so..... ludicrous.

Saint Andrew of Scotland.

2. St. Stachys the Apostle (38–54).

guess what? This Stachys (like Onesimus) is just another name fished out the bible and cynically used to forge a story from history around, based on just about nothing.

 "Salute Urbane, our helper in Christ, and Stachys my beloved." Rom 16:9.

Just like with Onesimus they add a safety clause in case you see how transparently false the fable about him is, that is....."it's not clear if it is him in Rom 16:9". It's not clear that he even existed as a bishop over Byzantium, never mind a proof of all his religious beliefs matching either Orthodoxy or the Evangelical house group movement. 

Make no mistake - the so called "interface between the Apostles and early bishops provably Orthodox" proves itself time and time again simply the forgery of history. Does not 1 Timothy 4 warn us that a Faith based on fables is actually demonic?.If this junk is all they can come up with as proof of a link between the Apostles and all their rites, rituals and man made traditions, concerning the Titular Head of Orthodoxy, imagine what it is like with the other seven so called Ecumenical bishops.

3. St. Onesimus (54–68).

Total fiction!!! This is supposedly the Onesimus of the Epistle of Philemon, "from slave to brother to Bishop" is simply the forgery of history. It is an old wives tale, a fable, worse, its forgery, fakery and cheap magic tricks with history, creating bishops that link them to the Apostles with a wave of a cloak and a puff of smoke., with almost not an atom of proof they ever existed, and if they ever did that they believed the avalanche of religious hocus pocus the Orthodox believe in.

4. Polycarpus I (69–89).

5. Plutarch (89–105)

Second Century,

5. Plutarch (89–105)

6. Sedecion (105–114)

7. Diogenes (114–129)

8. Eleutherius (129–136)

9. Felix (136–141)

10. Polycarpus II (141–144)

11. Athenodorus (144–148)

12. Euzois (148–154)

13. Laurence (154–166)

14. Alypius (166–169)

15. Pertinax (169–187)

16. Olympianus (187–198)

17. Mark I or Marcus I (198–211)

Third Century.

17. Mark I or Marcus I (198–211)

18. Philadelphus (211–217)

19. Cyriacus I (217–230)

20. Castinus (230–237)

21. Eugenius I (237–242)

22. Titus (242–272)

23. Dometius (272–284)

24. Rufinus I (284–293)

25. Probus (293–306)

Fourth Century.

25. Probus (293–306)

26. St. Metrophanes (306–314)                  Emperor Constantine 306-337

27. St. Alexander (314–337)                         Emperor Constantine 306-337

28) St. Paul I ("the Confessor") (337–339). Emperor Constantine 306-337

note:

before and after the death of Emperor Constantine, we are so called "reliably informed" that St Nicholas (root of - Santa Claus) (of Myra or Bari) was a Bishop in Greece, 

So Orthodoxy have us believe Two Saints, "Saint Constantine equal to an Apostle" and "St Nicholas" (Santa) were saints at the same time. 

  • 30. Macedonius I (342–346).

    • Paul I (346–350), restored 2nd time.

    • Macedonius I (351–360), restored.

32. Demophilus (370–380).

33. Evagrius (370 or 379).

34. Maximus I (380).

35. St. Gregory I of Nazianzus the Theologian (380–381).

36. Nectarius (381–397).

37. St. John Chrysostom (398–404).

Fifth Century.

37. St. John Chrysostom (398–404).

38. Arsacius of Tarsus (404–405).

39. Atticus (406–425).

40. Sisinnius I (426–427).

41. Nestorius (428–431).

42. Maximianus (431–434).

43. St. Proclus (434–446).

44. St. Flavian or Flavianus (446–449), also Flavian I.

Orthodox/Oriental Schism of 451: mentioned as I presume the Oriental Orthodox church deny the apostolic line of Bishops that proceeded from the date 451 AD? And have their own lines of "true apostolic bishops" (?).The break in communion between the various Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox churches did not occur suddenly, but rather gradually over 2-3 centuries following the Council of Chalcedon

45. St. Anatolius (449–458) (Patriarch from 451),

46. Gennadius I (458–471)

47. Acacius (471–488)

48. Fravitta (488–489), also Flavian II

49. Euphemius (489–495)

50. Macedonius II (495–511)

Sixth Century.

50. Macedonius II (495–511)

51. Timothy I (511–518)

52. John II the Cappadocian (518–520)

53. Epiphanius (520–535)

54. Anthimus I (535–536)

55. Menas (536–552)

56. Eutychius (552–565).

59. Cyriacus (596–606).

Seventh Century.

59. Cyriacus (596–606).

60. St. Thomas I (607–610).

61. Sergius I (610–638).

62. Pyrrhus I (638–641).

  • 63. Paul II (641–653).

    • Pyrrhus I (653–654), restored.

64. Peter (654–666).

65. Thomas II (667–669).

66. John V (669–675).

67. Constantine I (675–677).

68. Theodore I (677–679).

69. George I (679–686).

70. Paul III (687–693).

71. Callinicus I (693–705).

Eighth Century.

71. Callinicus I (693–705).

72. Cyrus (705–711).

73. John VI (712–715).

74. Germanus I (715–730).

75. Anastasius (730–754).

76. Constantine II (754–766).

77. Nicetas I (766–780).

78. Paul IV (780–784).

79. Saint Tarasius (784–806).

Ninth Century.

79. Saint Tarasius (784–806).

80. Nicephorus I (806–815).

81. Theodotus I Kassiteras (815–821).

82. Antony I (821–836).

83. John VII Grammaticus (836–843).

84. Methodius I (843–847).

85. Ignatius I (847–858).

  • 86. Photios I the Great (858–867).

    • Ignatius I (867–877), restored.

    • Photios I the Great (877–886), restored.

87. Stephen I (886–893).

88. Antony II Kauleas (893–901).

Tenth Century.

88. Antony II Kauleas (893–901).

89. Nicholas I Mystikos (901–907).

91. Stephen II of Amasea (925–928).

92. Tryphon, also Tryphonius (928–931).

93. Theophylactus (933–956).

94. Polyeuctus (956–970).

95. Basil I Scamandrenus (970–974).

96. Antony III the Studite (974–980).

97. Nicholas II Chrysoberges (984–996).

98. Sisinnius II (996–999).

Eleventh Century..

99.   Sergius II (1001–1019).

100. Eustathius (1019–1025).

101. Alexius I the Studite (1025–1043).

102. Michael I Cerularius (1043–1058).  The Great Schism of 1054.

 

 

Patriarchs of Constantinople since the Great Schism of 1054.

 

 

103. Constantine III Leichoudes (1058–1063).

104. John VIII Xiphilinos (1063–1075).

105. Kosmas I (1075–1081).

106. Eustratius Garidas (1081–1084).

107. Nicholas III Grammaticus (1084–1111)

Twelth Century.

107. Nicholas III Grammaticus (1084–1111)

108. John IX Agapetus (1111–1134)

109. Leo Styppeiotes (1134–1143)

110. Michael II Kourkouas (1143–1146)

111. Cosmas II Atticus (1146–1147)

112. Nicholas IV Muzalon (1147–1151)

113. Theodotus II (1151–1153)

114. Neophytos I (1153–1154)

115. Constantine IV Chliarenus (1154–1156)

116. Luke Chrysoberges (1156–1169)

117. Michael III of Anchialus (1169–1177)

118. Chariton (1177–1178)

119. Theodosius I Boradiotes (1178–1183)

120. Basil II Kamateros (1183–1186)

121. Niketas II Mountanes (1186–1189)

122. Leo Theotokites (1189–1190)

123. Dositheus (1190–1191)

124. George II Xiphilinos (1191–1198)

125. John X Kamateros (1198–1206)

Thirteenth Century.

125. John X Kamateros (1198–1206)

126. Michael IV Autoreianos (1206–1212)

127. Theodore II Eirenikos (1214–1216)

128. Maximos II (1216)

129. Manuel I Charitopoulos (1216–1222)

130. Germanus II (1223–1240)

132. Manuel II (1244–1255)

133. Arsenius Autoreianus (1255–1259).

  • 134. Nicephorus II (1260–1261).

    • Arsenius Autoreianus (1261–1265), restored.

135. Germanus III (1266).

136. Joseph I Galesiotes (1266–1275).

  • 137. John XI Bekkos (1275–1282).

    • Joseph I Galesiotes (1282–1283), restored.

138. Gregory II Cyprius (1283–1289).

139. Athanasius I (1289–1293).

  • 140. John XII (1293–1303).

    • Athanasius I (1303–1310), restored.

Fourteenth Century.

  • 140. John XII (1293–1303).

    • Athanasius I (1303–1310), restored.

141. Nephon I (1310–1314).

142. John XIII Glykys (1314–1320).

143. Gerasimos I (1320–1321).

144. Isaias (1321–1334).

145. John XIV Kalekas (1334–1347).

146. Isidore I (1347–1350).

147. Callistus I (1350–1354).

  • 148. Philotheus Kokkinos (1354–1355).

    • Callistus I (1355–1363), restored.

    • Philotheus Kokkinos (1363–1376), restored.

149. Macarius (1376–1379).

150. Nilus Kerameus (1379–1388).

  • 151. Antony IV (1388–1390).

    • Macarius (1390–1391), restored.

    • Antony IV (1391–1397), restored.

152. Callistus II Xanthopoulos (1397).

153. Matthew I (1397–1410).

Fifteenth Century.

153. Matthew I (1397–1410).

154. Euthymius II (1410–1416).

155. Joseph II (1416–1439).

156. Metrophanes II (1439–1443).

157. Gregory III Mammas (1443–1450).

158. Athanasius II (1450–1453).

On May 29, 1453 occurred the Fall of Constantinople, thus marking the end of the Byzantine Empire. The Ecumenical Patriarchate became subject to the Ottoman Empire.

159. Gennadius II Scholarios (1454–1456)

160. Isidore II Xanthopoulos (1456–1462)

There are different suggestions by scholars for the succession of the Patriarchs from 1462 to 1466. The main positions are the following:

According to Kiminas (2009):

 

161. Joasaph I, Apr 1462 – Apr 1463

Gennadius II, Apr 1463 – June 1463

162. Sophronius I, Jun 1463 – Aug 1464

Gennadius II, Aug 1464 – aut. 1465

163. Mark II, aut. 1465 – aut. 1466

164. Symeon I, au. 1466 – end 1466

 

According to Laurent (1968):

  • Joasaph I, Apr 1462 – Apr 1463

  • Gennadius II, Apr 1463 – May 1463

  • Sophronius I, May 1463 – July 1464

  • Gennadius II, Aug 1464 – aut. 1465

  • Symeon I, autumn 1465

  • Mark II, beg. 1466 – aut. 1466

 

According to Gemanos of Sardeis (1933–38):

  • Gennadius II, sum. 1462 – sum. 1463

  • Sophronius I, Aug 1463 – Aug 1464

  • Gennadius II, Aug 1464 – aut. 1464

  • Joasaph I, beg. 1465 – beg. 1466

  • Mark II, beg. 1466 – mid 1466

  • Symeon I, mid 1466 – end 1466.

Patriarchs of Constantinople (since) 1466–1833. 

  • 165. Dionysius I (end 1466–1471)

    • Symeon I of Trebizond (1471–1475), restored 1st time

 

​​166. Raphael I (1475–1476)​​.

  • 167. Maximus III (1476–1482)

    • Symeon I of Trebizond (1482–1486), restored 2nd time. 

  • 168. Nephon II (1486–1488)

    • Dionysius I (1488–1490), restored.

  • 169. Maximus IV (1491–1497)

    • Nephon II (1497–1498), restored 1st time. 

  • 170. Joachim I (1498–1502)

    • Nephon II (1502), restored 2nd time.

                                                                                part 2 >

wiki link to original wiki article:

List of Ecumenical Patriarchs of Constantinople.